The New Year in Flowers …Part 3 Pretty in Pink

For the final post in this series illustrating flowers from my recent photoshoot with Emma Davies (emmadaviesphotography.com), I’ve included the remaining images of my winter/spring arrangements in The Long Barn, Newton Valence.

 

This time the colour palette included red, pink and white – a combination that can look quite stark and hard.  I tried to avoid this by mixing lots of tonal ingredients that softened the sugary nature of the ranunculus and roses and created a loose arrangement where the emphasis was as much on the structure and textures as on the colours themselves.  Winter flowering cherry that had been pruned from trees around my Studio was included to offer a light partner to the gorgeous blush pink ranunculus and frothy white lilac flower bought a complete contrast in flower texture.  Deeper pink tones to give depth and contrast were added in the form of roses, hellebores and dark pittosporum and a loose framework of magnolia and twisted hazel gave the bouquet and arrangements a sculptural quality.

 

These flowers are a complete contrast to those shown in one of my previous posts where green, white and yellow were the dominant shades.  These make a statement, are bold and much punchier in style; however, they are still seasonal and beautiful for the bride who wants slightly more colour earlier in the year.

 

Caroline Davy Studio

Caroline Davy Studio

Caroline Davy Studio

Caroline Davy Studio

Caroline Davy Studio

Although we tend to think of Spring flowers being soft in palettes of green and white with a fresh and ‘clean’ appearance  – these photos show that with the wonderful choices of tulips, ranunculus, hellebores and foliage – you can still achieve a riot of colour in the early months of the year without it being too brash.  The light in winter and spring is obviously softer and strong colours could appear too dominant for a romantic early-year wedding.  However, mixed with lots of green and lighter textures,  you can still achieve strength and focus without losing the fresh, ‘just picked from the garden’ early-season style.